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A Greek Proposal by Lou Ramsden

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From Fact to Fiction on BBC Radio 4

BBC Radio 4, 2 June 2012
 
In this first installment of a new series of From Fact to Fiction, the series of playlets where different writers respond to the week's news, writer Lou Ramsden was inspired by the story that bookings for Greek holidays have recently soared, despite the country's uncertain economic situation.
 
Euan Clarke (Stephen Hoyle) has taken his girlfriend Laura (Sarah McDonald Hughes) on a cheap trip to Kos, with a view to asking him to marry her. Unfortunately the trip has not gone as planned: Laura has started smashing plates in the local restaurant, in the belief that this is what always happens in Greece (despite health and safety regulations); Euan has spent as little money as he can, and Laura now thinks he is something of a skinflint; while Laura eventually ends up losing her purse at the the end of the meal.
 
Local restaurateur Nikos (Jon Lolis) comes up with an offer Euan cannot refuse. For one night only, Euan can have the restaurant to himself, so that he can try to propose once more. No expense will be spared: the musicians will play Laura's favourite choice of music, and Nikos will provide free food and encouragement. Euan gives a speech, where he asks Laura to give up all her vices - for example, over-spending on credit cards - in return for marriage. However things do not turn out according to plan ...
 
A Greek Proposal takes recent events in Greece and gives them a personal dimension. Writer Ramsden shows how any offers with strings attached are often not worth the paper they are printed on: Laura is expected to reform herself, and receive little or nothing in return. If that is the only way people 0 or economies - can be changed, then perhaps it's not worth trying to reform them.
 
Performed with unquestioned zest by Hoyle, McDonald Hughes and Lolis, A Greek Proposal offered a sharp commentary on how the strong attempt to dominate the weak, without taking their feelings into account. The director was Charlotte Riches.